CTE

Welcome to the Career & Technical Education Department!

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SUSTAINABLE AGRI-BIOLOGY

This one year course, organized into four major units, integrates biological science practices and knowledge
into the practice of sustainable agriculture. Unit one addresses the question, what is sustainable agriculture?
Unit two, how does sustainable agriculture fit into our environment? Unit three, what molecular biology
principles guide sustainable agriculture? Unit four, How do we make decisions to maximize sustainable
agricultural practices within a functioning ecosystem? Within each unit, specific life principles integrate with
agricultural principles, as students gain knowledge of how the two disciplines inform each other, culminating
in the development of a sustainable farm model and portfolio of supporting student research.

CHEMISTRY AND AGRISCIENCE

This course explores the physical and chemical nature of soil as well as the relationships between soil, plants,
animals and agricultural practices. Students examine properties of soil and land and their connections to plant
and animal production. Using knowledge of scientific protocols as well as course content, students develop an
Agri-science research program. To complete that whole project each student will investigate and test an Agri-
science research question by formulating a scientific question related to the course content, formulating a
hypothesis based on related research conducting an experiment to test the hypothesis, collecting quantitative
data, and formulating a conclusion based on analysis of the data. The result of this research program is an in
depth research and experimentation paper that is technically written, based on scientific protocol, and cited
using APA formatting. Additionally, students develop and present a capstone soil management plan for
agricultural producers, demonstrating their knowledge of the soil chemistry content learned throughout the
course. Throughout the course, students are graded on participation in intra-curricular FFA activities as well
as the development and maintenance of an ongoing Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) program.

VETERINARY SCIENCE

This course is designed to provide students with the principles of veterinary science, focusing on the areas of
anatomy and physiology, nutrition, disease and genetics, and professional opportunities in veterinary
medicine. Students can apply “hands-on” practices with livestock on the school farm. FFA and record
keeping skills, along with student projects, are a part of the course and give students opportunities to put
classroom learning into real life practice.

AG ENGINEERING 1

This course prepares students for careers related to the construction, operation, and maintenance of equipment
used by the agricultural industry. Basic agricultural mechanics skills and safety cover woodworking,
electrical systems, plumbing, cold metal work, concrete, and welding technology. Basic skills are enhanced
through small project design and construction. In this course, students are encouraged to develop their
leadership abilities through active participation in the Fallbrook FFA. Students also gain valuable career
skills by having an SAE project that provides Supervised Agricultural Experiences outside of the classroom
and includes instruction of record-keeping skills. These two intra-curricular components (FFA and SAE)
enhance student performance and serve as the foundation for hands-on learning.

AG ENGINEERING 2: Small Engine Repair

Agriculture Small Engine Mechanics is a year-long Career Technical Education course in the Agriculture
Career Pathway. The course is aligned to both Agriculture and Career Technical Education California State
Standards. The course is presented to students at the introductory level of instruction. Instruction will take
place in the areas of tool use, measurement, preventative maintenance, diagnostics, personal and shop safety,
and application and design as it pertains to the subject of small internal combustion engines. Instruction will
be both classroom and lab setting, both individual and group designed. Throughout the course, students will
be graded on participation in intracurricular FFA activities as well as the development and maintenance of an
ongoing Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) program. Pending UC approval

ADVANCED AG ENGINEERING

This course expands on the skills learned in Agriculture Mechanics and provides the opportunity for students
to work on independent projects. Advanced topics deal with metal fabrication, small engines, agriculture
power and technology, and agriculture construction. In this course, students are encouraged to develop their
leadership abilities through active participation in the Fallbrook FFA. Students also gain valuable career
skills by having an SAE project that provides Supervised Agricultural Experiences outside of the classroom
and includes instruction of record-keeping skills. These two intra-curricular components (FFA and SAE)
enhance student performance and serve as the foundation for hands-on learning.

ENVIROMENTAL HORTICULTURE SCIENCE

This course provides students with theories and principles related to environmental horticulture
science. Agricultural effects of environmental ecology, plant physiology, plant pathology, soil structure, and
biotechnical applications in environmental horticulture are some of the topics covered in this course. Students
will explore careers associated with the horticultural industry along with the development of a horticulture
project and participation in the activities of the FHS FFA as an intra-curricular portion of this course.

ADVANCED ENVIROMENTAL HORTICULTURE SCIENCE

This integrated class combines an interdisciplinary approach to laboratory science and research with
agricultural management principles. Using skills and principles learned in the course, including the chemical
and biological principles that govern plant science and crop production, students design systems and
experiments to solve agricultural management issues currently facing the industry. Throughout the course,
students will be graded on participation in intracurricular FFA activities as well as the development and
maintenance of an ongoing Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) program.

FLORAL DESIGN

Students will develop an appreciation for floral design through a series of projects in various media including
tempera, pencil, flowers, and tile. Students are introduced to the elements and principles of visual art design,
such as line, shape/form, color, balance, and emphasis, using a series of floral-based projects to explore the
connections, relations, and applications to visual arts design. Various assignments based on historical culture,
color theory, and analytical critiques of various floral art works in conjunction with the development of
technical skills in floral art will serve as a foundation for more complex works such as multi-part floral
designs, topiary, and Bonsai art forms. Students will explore careers associated with the floral industry as
well as participate in floral classroom projects and FFA activities as an intra-curricular portion of this course.

ADVANCED FLORAL DESIGN

The Advanced Floral Design course allows students to apply an advanced artistic approach to floral design, as
well as incorporate the essential components of plant science, advanced business and leadership skills, and the
industry components outlined as a capstone course in an Ornamental Horticulture - Floral Design (sub
pathway) course of study within the Agriculture CTE Pathway. Students will expand on topics learned in the
first course, The Art and History of Floral Design, as well as their experiences in a variety of other agriculture or science courses. Topics will include floral design trends, historical time periods of the floral industry, post-harvest physiology, cut flower and plant identification, art concepts, elements and principles of design, cut flower and retail plant production, proper design techniques and mechanics, retail sales, and marketing strategies. In this course, students are encouraged to develop their leadership abilities through active participation in the Fallbrook FFA. Students also gain valuable career skills by having an SAE project that provides Supervised Agricultural Experiences outside of the classroom and includes instruction of record-keeping skills. These two intra-curricular components enhance student performance and serve as the foundation for hands-on learning.

This course is recommended for the student new to the dance program, with little or no prior dance
background. Students will acquire physical knowledge and awareness of basic dance techniques and styles
with an emphasis on ballet, jazz, lyrical, and hip-hop. Students in this class will be introduced to creative
choreographic principles, performance, responding and connecting at the basic level. Students will be
involved in the annual spring dance concert.

This course is recommended for the student who has mastered basic ballet and jazz technical skills. Students
should be able to demonstrate basic to intermediate level in jazz, lyrical, and hip-hop styles. This course will
emphasize creating, performing, responding, and connecting in dance. Students will participate in small group
activities utilizing advanced choreographic principles and learn about dance history, performance, and
production. Students are expected to participate in the annual spring dance concert.

This course is recommended for the serious dancer who has mastered ballet and jazz technical skills at the
advanced level and displays advanced movement in jazz, contemporary, and hip-hop styles of
dance. Emphasis of this class is on performance and creativity. Students are required to perform at school
and community events throughout the school year. Students are expected to create original works of
chorography using advanced choreographic principles and are required to perform in the annual spring dance
concert. Admittance into this class is open to 9th-12th grade students and is through audition with the teacher only.

This is an introductory course that is a prerequisite to other culinary and baking classes. In this course, the
students will learn the basic fundamentals of the kitchen and food preparation. Units include safety/sanitation,
knife skills, tools and equipment, culinary math and recipes along with nutrition. They will prepare a variety
of foods to complement learned basic fundamentals. Job preparation will include interview skills, résumé
writing, and job applications. In this course, students will learn about food, food culture, food history, food
safety, and current food trends.

This course provides students with the fundamental knowledge of baking science and artful techniques
required of bakers and pastry cooks. Students will gain hands-on knowledge of classic and contemporary
patisserie and baking processes in addition to beginning pastry arts. Course work is designed for students that
desire a career as a baker or pastry chef. The program outcome is that students will be prepared for entry-level
employment as professional and competent bakers, pastry cooks, or pastry entrepreneurs and meet the needs
of retail and wholesale baking and pastry establishments.

The Advanced Culinary Arts course places emphasis on the reinforcement of skills and knowledge learned in
Culinary Arts and Culinary Arts Baking, to further the development of more advanced culinary skill sets.
Development of stocks, soups and sauces along with formal introductions of culinary applications will
enhance the students’ understanding of cooking techniques, seasonings and flavorings, breakfast cookery,
baking and related global cuisine. All aspects of culinary math will continue to be developed as well as the
operating of both the front and back of the operations of a full service kitchen.

Students will learn to create short films and news packages from idea to inception. This course provides
introductory and intermediate training in digital media production. This course covers the following technical
elements: The three phases of production, 3 Act Storytelling, Video Camera Operation, Three Point Lighting,
Audio and Sound Mixing, Graphics, Remote Field Production (ENG), Career Planning/Management: Writer,
Producer, Director, Sound Designer, Cinematographer, Editor. If students take this course in 11th grade and
DMP 3/4 in 12th, they can get an IB Career Certificate in Filmmaking.

Students will learn to create short films and live, multi-camera studio productions from idea to
inception. This course provides intermediate to advanced training in digital media production. This course
covers the following technical elements: The Television Studio, 3 Act Storytelling, Video Camera Operation,
Studio Lighting, Audio Control Consoles, The Switcher, Set Design, Graphics, Remote Field Production
(multi-camera), and Career Planning/Management: Writer, Producer, Director, Sound Designer,
Cinematographer, Editor. If students take DMP 1/2 in the 11th grade and this course in 12th, they can
qualify for an IB Career Certificate in Filmmaking.

This is the culminating course within our CTE Advanced Manufacturing Pathway. Advanced Engineering
Principles is a laboratory-based class wherein students propose a culminating project that utilizes the skills
and principles learned in Advanced Manufacturing Pathway courses including designing, fabrication, electric
engineering and programing language. Similar to a dissertation, students will propose a project including an
inquiry they wish to find the answer to. The instructor will serve as an advisor/facilitator helping students to observe, question and to experiment with designs. Students will be encouraged to think critically, logically
and to defend a conclusion as is expected in the advanced manufacturing industry. Students will be required to
present and defend their culminating project at the end of the course including proficiency of key industry
skills.

Machine Tool Technology is a career and technical preparatory project and laboratory-based class. As much
as possible, you will practice in class what fabricators and engineers really do: observing, hypothesizing,
questioning, experimenting with designs and drawing conclusions. Questioning and thinking are
emphasized. Learning content (facts) is important, but helping you to think like a fabricator (critically,
logically, using justifications for arguments) is the focus of metal fabrication. Different points of view are
presented in the class, however you and your family can decide what views you take as your own. All
students in metal fabrication can succeed and excel. The way the class is structured and taught encourages
you to be responsible and interested. Neatness and clarity as well as correct spelling, punctuation and
grammar on all assignments are required. Papers that do not meet these requirements will not be
accepted. You will be encouraged to do high quality work of which you can be proud. Think about your
work; connect content from other disciplines and areas of your life.

This is an advanced course that allows students to expand on their pre-existing knowledge of manufacturing
and metalworking to produce and engineer products that are seen in the actual marketplace. Students will
expand their knowledge by using industry standard CNC (computer numerical control) machines. In this
class, students will complete coursework that is common to college engineering programs, trade schools and
union apprenticeship programs. Students have the opportunity to become certified in welding through this
course. Upon completion of this course, students will be ready to pursue a degree in Engineering, Metallurgy,
Materials Sciences, Project Management or any other building trades.

Design/Build is a two semester course at Fallbrook Union High School designed to familiarize students with
the concepts behind design and fabrication using a combination of pencils and paper, wood, concrete and at
times various other materials to achieve predetermined goals. This course has a STEAM (Science,
Technology, Engineering ART, and Math) focus and will include technology-based forms of artistic
expression, to offer a well-rounded creative environment for our students to experience a hands on learning
experience steeped equally in state of the art, technology, and meaningful hands-on design skills. While
creativity and artistic expression are key to this introductory Architectural Design course, we put equal
emphasis on the necessity of careful documentation, and reflection.

Computer-aided design and drafting (CAD) is important within the advanced manufacturing industry used to
create engineering designs. In this course, students are introduced to engineering, learning the basics of CAD
software: creating points, lines, other geometric forms, isometric drawings, and 3D models. Students will
create designs into a three-dimensional (3D) environment and use machines or 3D printers to execute their
designs. Students will be introduced to the areas of mechanical drafting which will include single and three
view drawings, isometric, oblique and sectional drawings. Students will also learn fundamentals of
architectural drafting through drawing floor, elevation, plot, and electrical plans.

This is the culminating course within our CTE Advanced Manufacturing Pathway. Product Innovation &
Design is a laboratory-based class wherein students propose a culminating project that utilizes the skills and
principles learned in Advanced Manufacturing Pathway courses including designing, fabrication, electric
engineering and programing language. Similar to a dissertation, students will propose a project including an
inquiry they wish to find the answer to. The instructor will serve as an advisor/facilitator helping students to observe, question and to experiment with designs. Students will be encouraged to think critically, logically
and to defend conclusion as is expected in the advanced manufacturing industry. Students will be required to
present and defend their culminating project at the end of the course including proficiency of key industry
skills.

This course covers introductory topics for careers in high demand technical fields such as advanced
manufacturing, web and app design, electrical engineering, or even computer programming. The course
covers five of the most useful basic programming languages, and the basics of electrical engineering and
micro-controller programming. These skills are built upon each other and framed within the contexts
of creating innovative projects from robotic arms and autonomous programmable robotics, smart home
technology, app development and web design. Students will through the use of everything from wireless
Bluetooth control, Infrared Remote Control, and high tech sensors to provide our students with the
foundations to grow lifelong skills within the ever expanding world of robotics, engineering, and technology.

Changes in the transportation service industry. This is the first course in the Transportation Technology
pathway. The Transportation Technology course covers basic principles of operations of engines,
transmission, steering, suspension, brakes, electrical, and computer controlled systems found on the modern
automobile. Scheduled, preventative automotive maintenance, and minor services are performed.
Transportation theory and service procedures including lecture/discussion and hands-on experience. Designed
for the student with little or no background in the transportation field. Upon successful completion of the
course, students should be able to:
1) Demonstrate the ability to safely work in an automotive shop environment
2) Prepare a work order & safety inspection order in compliance with industry standards.
3) Identify the components of the major automotive systems & explain the functions of each
4) Perform minor maintenance & service on modern transportation vehicles.

The Transportation Technology II course prepares students for post-secondary education and employment in
the transportation industry. Transportation Technology II: Maintenance and Light Repair is the second course
in the transportation technology program of study and covers important skills and knowledge on becoming a
professional service technician. Students study automotive general electrical systems, starting and charging
systems, batteries, lighting, brakes and heating and cooling systems. Hours earned in the Maintenance and
Light Repair course may be used toward meeting National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation
(NATEF) standards. Fallbrook High School plans to apply for NATEF accreditation, which will allow
students completing all of the Maintenance and Light Repair courses to enter the automotive service industry
as an ASE (Automotive Service Excellence) Certified Technician.

The evolution of transportation technology repair has seen a change in emphasis from mechanical to technical
work. Presently, vehicles use high-tech computers and complex electronic systems to monitor the
performance of the vehicle. Students will gain skill development in the professional maintenance, repair, and
diagnosis of transportation technology malfunctions. This course introduces transportation technology
students to the role of hybrid and alternative fuel systems in today's society. The course will cover the design,
theory of operation and service of several current hybrid and alternative fuel vehicles. The class will run in a
similar format to an actual automotive service and repair facility where students service vehicles supplied by
the Fallbrook community. This series of courses is complementary to the Advanced Manufacturing pathway.
Fallbrook High School plans to apply for NATEF accreditation, which will allow students completing all of
the Maintenance and Light Repair courses to enter the automotive service industry as an ASE (Automotive
Service Excellence) Certified Technician.

Information Systems will be the first course in the Cyber Security pathway. Information Systems introduces
computer basics and information systems. Content includes fundamental concepts of hardware and software
as applied to computers in a business environment; programming, operating systems, the Internet, data
communications, systems development life cycle, and information systems; use of typical software packages
including word processing, creating spreadsheets, databases and presentation graphics. Hands-on experience
with personal computers in labs will be included. This course is intended for those seeking a career as a
computer professional, an understanding of the role of Information Systems in the business community, or
introductory “end user” computer skills.

Cybersecurity prepares students for success in postsecondary information technology majors and for careers
in network administration and information technology support services with a focus on cybersecurity. The
course includes a series of technical modules that provide hands-on learning as well as knowledge and skills
development in computer hardware, operating systems, networking, coding, and security infrastructures.
Industry-based curricula are utilized in network and virtual image environments to emulate real-life scenarios
and prepare students for industry recognized certifications. Students research and address ethical and legal
standards related to information security. Students mitigate cyber vulnerabilities through intricate problem
solving scenarios requiring critical thinking, incident response and analysis, and collaboration. Ethical
hacking and penetration testing concepts will be introduced with an emphasis on information security
research. Students will be expected to us network scanners, network packet capture, network security and
auditing tools to accomplish tasks. The Cybersecurity curriculum is designed to ensure a deep understanding
of privacy, reliability, and integrity of information systems for students preparing for majors and careers
in Cyber Security and Information and Communications Technology.

Calendar

  • Jul07
    CADA Summer Camp

    July 7-10

  • Jul27
    ASB Program Retreat Summer 2022

    July 27-28

  • Aug01
    Senior Registration
  • Aug02
    Junior Registration
  • Aug03
    Sophomore Registration
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